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  • Stock Markets Plunge, Concerns Abound… Recession?

    The first half of January 2016 has been the worst New Year’s opening for the US stock markets in history. Yet nothing much has changed economically since the end of last year. So why is the Dow Jones down 8.24%, the S&P 500 down 8.00% and the Nasdaq down 10.36% in just the first two weeks or so of the New Year? The answer is not yet clear.

    According to the Stock Trader’s Almanac, if US stocks move lower in January, that means a down year for equities 75% of the time. While January is not over yet, it’s hard to imagine that stocks could close up for the month. So are we looking at the first down year for US stocks since 2008? Time will tell, but it sure looks that way.

    Questions abound. Did the Fed make a huge mistake by raising short-term rates by a mere 0.25% in December? Did news that China’s economy grew at only around 6% last year and may be slowing more this year upset the global apple cart? Are plunging oil prices really a bad thing?  Is a new global recession just around the corner? Should we be preparing for a new recession here in the US this year?

    These are the questions everyone is asking in the wake of the plunging stock market prices we have seen from the beginning of 2016. It is true that the current economic recovery which began in 2009 is the weakest in more than a half century, but this is nothing new. Rather than negative growth, GDP has expanded only by about 2% since Obama took office.

    Yet the Fed’s latest estimate of 4Q GDP growth has now fallen from 2.0% on December 17 to only 0.6% in the latest GDPNow estimate in the second week of January. This economy is losing momentum fast. The risks of a recession this year are quickly increasing. This may help explain why equities are tanking so far this year.

    There’s so much to talk about today, I’m not sure where to start. Let’s begin with the case for a recession this year, both globally and here at home.

    We’ll end on a positive note from Mark Hulbert, editor of the Hulbert Financial Digest, who suggests that this latest downward market correction may be over before too long. Let’s get started.

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  • Economy Is Improving, Yet Most Americans Are Pessimistic

    Today we tackle several issues. We start with the fact that several new surveys show that most Americans remain pessimistic about the economy and the direction the country is headed. This is despite the fact that the economy has been growing for the last five years, the unemployment rate is the lowest in seven years and the stock market has more than tripled since 2009.

    Yet despite these latest reports showing that most Americans are pessimistic about the future, the widely-followed Consumer Confidence Index has risen sharply in the last few years. Most analysts have no answer for this discrepancy. I have some specific thoughts on this contradiction, and I’ll do my best to explain it today.

    The much stronger than expected unemployment report on November 6 has sent the stock markets sharply lower in recent days, based on fears that the Fed will hike interest rates at its next policy meeting on December 15-16. I’ll offer my thoughts on what will determine the Fed’s decision next month. I wouldn’t bet money on a rate hike just yet.

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  • Stocks Fell Off A Cliff in Late August - What To Do Now

    What an absolutely CRAZY couple of weeks we’ve just been through! The collapse of stock prices around the world has stunned investors. By some measures, the plunge in the Dow and the S&P 500 in August was the worst in 75 years, even worse than the Crash of 1987. While I advised readers to reduce long-only equity exposure significantly in April and May, I was not expecting a 15% spike down in just a few trading sessions.

    Later in today’s E-Letter, I will introduce you to the latest money manager to make it on to our recommended list. This money manager specializes in buying and selling options on stock index contracts. This is one of the more unusual strategies I have seen over the years, but when you see the results, you’ll understand why I’m so excited to add ZEGA Financial to our stable of recommended Advisors.

    Before we get to the above issues, let me briefly comment on last Thursday’s better than expected report on 2Q Gross Domestic Product.

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  • China’s Stock Markets Imploded In June - Why?

    While the mainstream media has been obsessed with Greece over the last month or so, there has been scant attention paid to the fact that China’s high-flying stock markets unexpectedly have plummeted in June and were down around 30% through the end of last week.

    China’s exploding economy in recent years has made it the hotspot for global investors. Mutual fund families and ETFs have rushed to add exposure to the Chinese markets. China’s two major stock exchanges have seen their share indexes surge over 100% in the last year, drawing ever more investors to jump in. This includes many middle class Chinese who have never invested in anything before (many of whom have borrowed money to invest).

    Yet as noted above, in the last month, share prices on China’s stock exchanges have plummeted by around 30% as of the end of last week, to the surprise of just about everyone. The decline continued overnight (Tuesday).  Many investors don’t even know it yet since they have not seen their June account statements.

    With the world’s attention focused on Greece over the last couple of weeks, the China story has not made its way onto the media’s radars for the most part. For that reason, I will focus on the latest disturbing developments in the China story today.

    But before we get to the troubling news on China, let’s take a look at a few of the latest US economic reports – including the June unemployment report, the big jump in consumer confidence last month and the Gallup Job Creation Index which is at a new record high.

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  • Stock Markets Have Stalled Since March - Now What?

    The major stock indexes (Dow, S&P 500, Nasdaq) have gone virtually sideways since March. Yes, there was the brief day or two in May when all three indexes recorded new record highs, but then promptly sold off sharply. This suggests that there is a lot of overhead resistance just above current levels. As a result, the natives are getting restless! And for good reason. Today I have reprinted a very good report from a seasoned stock market analyst who points to a number of key factors that are weighing on the stock market presently, factors that most investors pay little or no attention to. His point is that it may be very difficult for the stock markets to break out of the recent trading range to the upside. For that reason, we could be headed for a serious downward correction - the likes of which we haven't seen since September/October of last year or worse. I think you'll find his analysis very interesting. Following that discussion, I will give you my latest thoughts on when the Fed will raise interest rates - what with so much attention focused on that question. And there's a possible new twist as to how the Fed may go about announcing and then actually implementing the first rate hike that you'll find interesting (or maybe too cute). Finally, the World Bank released its mid-year economic projections last week and downgraded its 2015 forecast for the US. No surprise there, at least not for me and my readers. What was most interesting was that the World Bank joined the IMF in asking the Fed not to rai

    The major stock indexes (Dow, S&P 500, Nasdaq) have gone virtually sideways since March. Yes, there was the brief day or two in May when all three indexes recorded new record highs, but then promptly sold off sharply. This suggests that there is a lot of overhead resistance just above current levels. As a result, the natives are getting restless! And for good reason.

    Today I have reprinted a very good report from a seasoned stock market analyst who points to a number of key factors that are weighing on the stock market presently, factors that most investors pay little or no attention to. His point is that it may be very difficult for the stock markets to break out of the recent trading range to the upside. For that reason, we could be headed for a serious downward correction - the likes of which we haven't seen since September/October of last year or worse. I think you'll find his analysis very interesting.

    Following that discussion, I will give you my latest thoughts on when the Fed will raise interest rates - what with so much attention focused on that question. And there's a possible new twist as to how the Fed may go about announcing and then actually implementing the first rate hike that you'll find interesting (or maybe too cute).

    Finally, the World Bank released its mid-year economic projections last week and downgraded its 2015 forecast for the US. No surprise there, at least not for me and my readers. What was most interesting was that the World Bank joined the IMF in asking the Fed not to raise interest rates until sometime next year. That raises the question: Is Janet Yellen listening?

    se interest rates until sometime next year. That raises the question: Is Janet Yellen listening?

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  • Is Your Stock Portfolio Up Over 30% This Year?

    This week’s Forecasts & Trends E-Letter beings with a simple question, but it’s one that can have a major effect on your financial well-being. Given that government intervention in the markets now seems to be built into our expectations, I’m going to recap one of our recommended money managers that has been able to navigate the QE3-induced market rally and is up over 30% year-to-date as of September 30.

    More importantly, the money manager I will talk about today - Niemann Capital Management - has significantly outperformed the S&P 500 Index since the company's inception in 1996, both on the upside and the downside.

    Yet return is only half of the equation. The other half is whether an investment strategy has the ability to manage risks by moving to cash when the market takes a downturn, which it eventually will. Niemann also covers both bases by offering a momentum-based strategy on the upside, and the ability to move to cash during downward corrections and bear markets.

    Best of all, Niemann’s not an amateur in this business.  Don Niemann and his staff have been successfully managing their Risk Managed Program for 17 years, so they’ve seen several different market cycles. I’m highlighting Niemann today because I think they are a viable alternative for investors who are in the market and getting nervous about a pullback, as well as investors on the sidelines who fear that the market may have risen too far too fast for them to participate.

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  • Some Scary Bumps in the Road Just Ahead

    The major stock indexes moved lower after setting new record highs in early August, although prices have recovered somewhat in the last few days. So was the weakness in August just an overdue correction before moving even higher? Maybe, but there are a number of things coming up in the next month or so that could rattle the markets even more, including whether or not we go to war with Syria.

    Clearly, the stock and bond markets continue to be nervous about the Fed cutting back on its QE bond and mortgage purchases, perhaps as soon as the Fed’s next policy meeting that ends on September 18. There is also some anxiety about who will be the next Fed chairman (or woman).

    Yet there are other upcoming concerns that the markets seem to be worried about, as well they should. Certainly, the continued rise in interest rates is a serious issue for the markets and the economy. The yield on 10-year Treasury notes has soared from 1.6% back in May to near 3%. Long bond yields are nearing 4%. Investors don’t know what lies ahead.

    The markets are also starting to factor in the looming battle in Washington over the federal budget for FY2014, which begins on October 1. President Obama vows he won’t negotiate this time around. Also, there is another battle over the debt ceiling coming by mid-October and yet another threat of a government shutdown.

    We'll look into all of these issues today and how they may affect the markets.

    But before we get into those issues, let’s examine last Friday’s jobs report for August. The White House and the media hailed it as a success since the headline unemployment rate fell from 7.4% to 7.3%. What they failed to point out was the decline occurred because a lot more folks dropped out of the labor market. Truth is, the report was once again a disappointment.

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  • Stock Market Lingers At A Precarious Place

    The Dow Jones Industrial Average has flirted with its all-time of 14,198 twice in February as the Dow managed to rise above the 14,000 mark but then fell back. The S&P 500 Index is not quite as close to its all-time high, but it is within striking distance. There is widespread optimism that both indexes can break-out to new record highs, which would likely spark a new buying surge.

    On the other hand, if the Dow and S&P fail to break out, the result could be a nasty selloff. The stock markets shrugged off the fiscal cliff melodrama at the end of last year and then rallied strongly. But there are reasons to believe that the upcoming "sequester" fight could unsettle the markets and derail the attempt to make new highs. We'll talk about that possibility today.

    Before we go there, we take a look at the latest economic reports. There's good news and bad news - no surprise there. We'll also look at the latest surge in gasoline prices and why that is more bad news for consumers and the economy. And I will summarize the latest economic forecasts from the Congressional Budget Office. Finally, I will give you my thoughts on the issue of raising the minimum wage.

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  • Will Baby Boomers Wreck the Market? (The Sequel)

    Almost six years ago, I wrote an article about whether the Baby Boomers would crash the stock market when they retired. That dated article is still among the most viewed by visitors on our website even though a lot has happened in the financial world since it was written.

    The premise is that as Baby Boomers retire, they will cash in stocks in favor of lower-risk investments, thus tanking the stock markets. In my earlier E-Letter, I analyzed this claim and concluded that retiring Baby Boomers were not likely to negatively affect the stock markets in a major way for a variety of reasons.

    However, since writing that article in August of 2006 we've experienced a global financial crisis and major bear market in stocks. Would my advice be the same today?

    Because of the popularity of this topic, I am going to revisit the idea that retiring Baby Boomers may crash the stock market. Now that the oldest Boomers are actually retiring, it will be interesting to see if the answer is any clearer now than in 2006.

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  • Uncertainty is Fertile Ground for Scam Artists

    Over the years, there are subjects that I repeat periodically in my weekly E-letters due to their importance. One such is the subject of investment scams and what investors can do to recognize and avoid them. Unfortunately, even though I and many other writers continue to warn investors about these scams, thousands of people lose millions of dollars each year to such schemes.

    In this week's E-Letter, I'm going to discuss how you can avoid being a victim of scam artists and others intent on separating you from your money. I'll also discuss a few "new" scams that have been more prevalent now that fixed income investments have such low returns and stock market risk is high.

    Even if you are confident that you won't be the victim of an investment fraud, it might be a good idea to forward this issue along to friends and relatives who may not be as experienced and may not know that if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

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  • European Debt Crisis Revisited - Implications For the US

    Today we take a fresh look at the European debt crisis which is worsening. Just over a month ago, EU leaders agreed on a second bailout loan for Greece to keep it from defaulting. That bailout loan had to be approved by all EU member nations, and several have refused to do so unless Greece can put up collateral. This has caused the bailout agreement to unravel and Germany's Chancellor Andrea Merkel is frantically trying to put it back together. If she fails, we could get another serious shock to the equity markets in the US.

    Meanwhile, the European Central Bank began buying huge chunks of government bonds from Italy and Spain to keep their credit markets functioning. Some argue that the ECB is not authorized to make such purchases but it is doing so anyway. It remains to be seen just how long the ECB can continue this large-scale quantitative easing. In any event, the European debt crisis is worsening, and I continue to believe that it will have more negative consequences for our markets here.

    A new CNN poll found that Americans' confidence in Congress is at a new low. For the first time ever, a majority of Americans want the bums in Washington voted out of office -- including their own Representatives in Congress. In past polls a majority wanted some members of Congress kicked out, but not their own Representatives. You'll find this story very interesting. Finally, I leave you today with a very good article written by Tony Blankley who offers President Obama some advice for his major speech on Thursday night.

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